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The Realities of Reality - Part II: Making Sense of Why Modern Science Advances (Volume 2)

By Dufour, Fritz

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Book Id: WPLBN0100301837
Format Type: PDF (eBook)
File Size: 1.83 MB.
Reproduction Date: 3/23/19

Title: The Realities of Reality - Part II: Making Sense of Why Modern Science Advances (Volume 2)  
Author: Dufour, Fritz
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Non Fiction, Philosophy
Collections: Philosophy, Authors Community, Education
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Fritz Dufour
Member Page: Fritz Dufour

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Dufour, F. (n.d.). The Realities of Reality - Part II: Making Sense of Why Modern Science Advances (Volume 2). Retrieved from http://worldebookfair.org/


Description
The difference between Part I and Part II – Volumes 1 & 2 – of this series, is that in Part I the author showed how what we call reality starts with the inner self whereas Part II describes what, in fact, impacts and modifies the environment or reality and what are the factors behind that dynamics. What impacts and modifies the environment is science. This Volume 2 starts by showing how technology plays an important role in scientific progress. Although the relationship between the two is symbiotic, science can exist without technology but technology desperately needs science. Military technology is an example of how technology can help science advance. Some military inventions end up having civilian use. Science being at the center of society, the book makes the case for the direct impact of such social sciences as politics and economics on the advancement of science. Politics, says the author, influences science because of uncertainty in science, and economics does it thanks to the availability of money to scholars and scientists for their research. On the other hand, government also influences scientific progress through regulations. The book gives cyberspace regulation as an example. Furthermore, by showing how art influences science, the author really argues for the polyfactorial aspect of scientific progress. In that line of thought, he goes on to also prove that factors such as skepticism, curiosity, and the quest for knowledge greatly influence the advancement of science. That, says the author, “is a ninety-degree turn … By ending Part two that way, I wanted to, somehow, link it to Part I, which argues that reality starts from within.”

Summary
The difference between Part I and Part II – Volumes 1 & 2 – of this series, is that in Part I the author showed how what we call reality starts with the inner self whereas Part II describes what, in fact, impacts and modifies the environment or reality and what are the factors behind that dynamics. What impacts and modifies the environment is science. This Volume 2 starts by showing how technology plays an important role in scientific progress. Although the relationship between the two is symbiotic, science can exist without technology but technology desperately needs science. Military technology is an example of how technology can help science advance. Some military inventions end up having civilian use. Science being at the center of society, the book makes the case for the direct impact of such social sciences as politics and economics on the advancement of science. Politics, says the author, influences science because of uncertainty in science, and economics does it thanks to the availability of money to scholars and scientists for their research. On the other hand, government also influences scientific progress through regulations. The book gives cyberspace regulation as an example. Furthermore, by showing how art influences science, the author really argues for the polyfactorial aspect of scientific progress. In that line of thought, he goes on to also prove that factors such as skepticism, curiosity, and the quest for knowledge greatly influence the advancement of science. That, says the author, “is a ninety-degree turn … By ending Part two that way, I wanted to, somehow, link it to Part I, which argues that reality starts from within.”

Excerpt
If science is defined as anything that can change or potentially change the environment, it goes without saying that science is also anything that can change or potentially change man himself because man is at the center of science. The nature of science reflects the nature of man. Although science is not stationary and that it changes as our environment changes, because scientific method and scientific paradigms change at different eras, scientific progress is multifaceted. Today, we are witnessing some advances in science that would not have been possible two hundred years ago. Politics, government regulations, economics, the military, the quest for energy, and our thirst for technology are amongst the most powerful forces that drive today’s scientific progress. And these forces are themselves influenced by how research is done, in other words, by today’s changing research spectrum. A large part of our attempt to understand why modern science advances has to do with, first, understand our modern research environment. The way we structure our scientific spectrum weighs heavily in the goals we set for science and determine the nature of scientific results. Science is all the more important that it ultimately impacts society. Science is an institution and as such it educates people, promotes research, and caters to society. Therefore, the scientific community – besides structuring the research process – has a duty to promote responsible behaviors or conducts by establishing normative rules. Scientific progress is inseparable from society and vice versa … Technology is an offshoot of science. However, science needs technology to progress. In fact, this is another symbiotic relationship of science with another field. This is a classic debate. This is a relationship similar to that between knowledge and skill. Knowledge includes fact, information, and skills acquired by a person through education or experience. It's the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject. Skill is the ability to do something well. It's an expertise or a hand-on experience. Whereas knowledge can stand alone, skill often includes knowledge. Skill is a whole. Skill is practical. Knowledge is mainly theoretical. So, let’s think of science as knowledge and technology as skill. Science can exist without technology but technology desperately needs science. The relationship between science and technology has become symbiotic especially in modern times.

Table of Contents
Acknowledgements………………………………………………………………………………………………….... 3 Description, Excerpt, and Topics Discussed in Part II, Volume 1……………………………………………………. 4 Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………….....6 CHAPTER I: Contributions of Technology to Scientific Progress................................................................................12 Engineering or Technological Discoveries That Have Impacted Modern Science……........................17 Outlook for Technology’s Impact on Science…………………………………………........................22 CHAPTER II: Contributions of Military Technology to Scientific Progress…………………….................................26 CHAPTER III: Role of Politics in Science and Technology……………………………………..................................42 What Is Uncertainty in Science?...........................................................................................................47 Implications of Scientific Uncertainty…………………………………………………......................49 Can the Status Quo Be Changed?.........................................................................................................55 CHAPTER IV: Economics and Scientific Progress…………………………………………………………………...60 CHAPTER V: Government Regulation of Science and Scientific Progress……………………..................................74 The Challenges of Cyberspace and Its Regulation…………………………………………………... 80 How much Does the U.S. Government Regulation of Scientific Research Cost Taxpayers?.............. 85 CHAPTER VI: Art and Scientific Progress………………………………………………………………………….. 89 CHAPTER VII: Space Exploration and Scientific Progress……………………………………................................111 CHAPTER VIII: Role of Food Science in Scientific Progress……………………………………………………….128 CHAPTER IX: Role of the Quest for Energy in Scientific Progress…………………………………........................143 CHAPTER X: Role of Doubt, Curiosity, and the Quest for Knowledge in Scientific Progress…………………… 158 Skepticism and Scientific Progress………………………………………………………………….159 Curiosity and Scientific Progress……………………………………………………………………164 The Quest for Knowledge and Scientific Progress………………………………………………….171 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 176 Bibliography…………………………………………………………………………………………………………181 By the Same Author…………………………………………………………………………….................................204

 

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