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World Health Organization Publication : Year 2002 ; Issue 9241545844: Food Safety Issues Terrorist Threats to Food Guidance for Establishing and Strengthening Prevention and Response Systems

By World Health Organization

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Book Id: WPLBN0000170244
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.4 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005
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Title: World Health Organization Publication : Year 2002 ; Issue 9241545844: Food Safety Issues Terrorist Threats to Food Guidance for Establishing and Strengthening Prevention and Response Systems  
Author: World Health Organization
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Health., Public health, Wellness programs
Collections: Medical Library Collection, World Health Collection
Historic
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Publisher: World Health Organization

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Organization, W. H. (n.d.). World Health Organization Publication : Year 2002 ; Issue 9241545844. Retrieved from http://worldebookfair.org/


Description
Medical Reference Publication

Excerpt
Executive Summary The malicious contamination of food for terrorist purposes is a real and current threat, and deliberate contamination of food at one location could have global public health implications. This document responds to increasing concern in Member States that chemical, biological or radionuclear agents might be used deliberately to harm civilian populations and that food might be a vehicle for disseminating such agents. The Fifty-fifth World Health Assembly (May 2002) also expressed serious concern about such threats and requested the Organization to provide tools and support to Member States to increase the capacity of national health systems to respond. Outbreaks of both unintentional and deliberate foodborne disease can be managed by the same mechanisms. Sensible precautions, coupled with strong surveillance and response capacity, constitute the most efficient and effective way of countering all such emergencies, including food terrorism. This document provides guidance to Member States for integrating consideration of deliberate acts of food sabotage into existing programmes for controlling the production of safe food. It also provides guidance on strengthening existing communicable disease control systems to ensure that surveillance, preparedness and response systems are sufficiently sensitive to meet the threat of any food safety emergency. Establishment and strengthening of such systems and programmes will both increase Member States’ capacity to reduce the increasing burden of foodborne illness and help them to address the threat of food terrorism. The activities undertaken by Member States must be proportional to the size of the threat, and resources must be allocated on a priority basis. Prevention, although never completely effective, is the first line of defence. The key to preventing food terrorism is establishment and enhancement of existing food safety management programmes and implementation of reasonable security measures. Prevention is best achieved through a cooperative effort between government and industry, given that the primary means for minimizing food risks lie with the food industry. This document provides guidance for working with industry, and specific measures for consideration by the industry are provided. Member States require alert, preparedness and response systems that are capable of minimizing any risks to public health from real or threatened food terrorism. This document provides policy advice on strengthening existing emergency alert and response systems by improving links with all the relevant agencies and with the food industry. This multi-stakeholder approach will strengthen disease outbreak surveillance, investigation capacity, preparedness planning, effective communication and response.

Table of Contents
Contents Executive Summary ..............................................................................................................1 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................2 1.1 Purpose......................................................................................................................2 1.2 Definitions and scope ...............................................................................................3 1.3 Food as a vehicle for terrorist acts .........................................................................3 1.4 Comparative risks of food and other media as vehicles for terrorist threats.....5 1.5 Potential effects of food terrorism..........................................................................5 1.5.1 Illness and death.................................................................................................5 1.5.2 Economic and trade effects................................................................................5 1.5.3 Impact on public health services........................................................................6 1.5.4 Social and political implications........................................................................7 1.6 Chemical and biological agents and radionuclear materials that could be used in food terrorism......................................................................................................7 1.7 Establishing and strengthening national prevention and response systems.......7 1.8 Setting priorities.......................................................................................................9 2. Prevention ........................................................................................................................10 2.1 Introduction............................................................................................................10 2.2 Existing systems .....................................................................................................10 2.3 Strengthening food safety management programmes ........................................11 2.4 Prevention and response systems in the food industry.......................................12 2.4.1 The role of the food industry ...........................................................................12 2.4.2 Agricultural production and harvesting ...........................................................13 2.4.3 Processing and manufacture ............................................................................13 2.4.4 Storage and transport .......................................................................................14 2.4.5 Wholesale and retail distribution .....................................................................14 2.4.6 Food service .....................................................................................................15 2.4.7 Tracing systems and market recalls .................................................................15 2.4.8 Monitoring .......................................................................................................15 2.5 Reducing access to chemical and biological agents and radionuclear materials..................................................................................................................16 2.6 Prevention at points of entry.................................................................................16 2.7 Useful source material ...........................................................................................16

 

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