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Myth of a Nomad

Romani Nation
Names are as important as the histories embedded within them. They imbue the power of both insidious implication and outright reference, revealing ignorance and tolerance. Incorrectly naming anything or anyone is the first step towards a host of other problems. One such name is “gypsy.”

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White Rose

Hans and Sophie Scholl
White Rose was a underground collective, led by brother and sister Hans and Sophie Scholl who wrote and distributed pamphlets denouncing Nazi Germany and calling for German people to uproot their ignorance and inaction.

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Concrete Poetry

Opening Language Borders
Dylan Thomas said, "Poetry is what in a poem makes you laugh, cry, prickle, be silent, makes your toenails twinkle, makes you want to do this or that or nothing, makes you know that you are alone in the unknown world, that your bliss and suffering is forever shared and forever all your own." Emily Dickinson said, "If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry."

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Filipino Struggle for Independence

José Rizal
Not all revolutions are violent, and not all revolutionaries are led by extremists. On June 19, 1861, one such peaceful Filipino revolutionary was born: José Rizal.

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Tennis

A Royal Score for All
In 2008, during an afternoon marred by rain, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal participated in one of the greatest tennis matches in the history of the sport. For almost five hours the two rivals volleyed and traded leads, keeping their opponents on their toes. Federer, just two points from victory (and a consecutive sixth Wimbledon Championship) had trouble returning Nadal's serves, and Nadal went on the claim the title. 

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Folk Music

Traversing Histories through Sound
Folk music traces cultural shifts and movements, specifically the recreations, laments, and political ideologies of a culture. William John Thoms, a British writer and self-described antiquary, coined the term folklore in 1846. The corresponding music, much like traditional art, literature, and knowledge, was passed on through oral communication and example. Volk, a German expression that predates both the Great War and World War II, means "people as a whole" and provides further insight into the worlds Thoms researched.  Folklore described the customs, superstitions, and traditions of "uncultured classes," searching for a connection between common folk and the societies of which they were a part. 

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Cameras

A Timeless Fascination
From the creation and popularization of the daguerreotype to the newest smartphone technology, cameras have documented virtually every type of relationship in the civilized and natural world. Cameras work as time machines, capturing and preserving the memories we create for ourselves. Whether it is through vernacular photography, which typically involves unknown photographers seeking beauty in the ordinary, domestic lives of folks, or fashion photography, which is purposefully and dutifully stylized to suit the latest cultural trends, cameras are powerful tools that have become permanent fixtures in our efforts to track the progression of people, places, and ideas across the world. 

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Body Beauty

How Body Types Evolved Throughout History
There’s a common phrase that says, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” It means that beauty can’t be judged objectively. What one person believes is beautiful may not appeal to another.

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Public Displays of Affection

Social Affection
Each culture has its own social norms. A behavior or body gesture may be acceptable to one culture, but offensive to another. It’s wise to understand the cultural norms of those you’ll be interacting with in social settings, while conducting business, or when traveling. 

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Serendipity

Fortunate Medical Mishaps
 Nobody wants to make a mistake, especially at work, but some mishaps become advantageous. When we’re sick and require antibiotics, we should be thankful for a lucky discovery made by Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming.

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Henry Ford

Fordlandia
After building the Quadricycle,the first gasoline-powered horseless carriage, American business tycoon and industrialist Henry Ford achieved many more accomplishments. In 1903, he founded the Ford Motor Company. One month later, the first Ford car Model A was assembled at a plant in Detroit.

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Film

Early Accolades
Hollywood has a long, glittering history of lauding its own. From Academy Awards to Oscars to independent films, the industry ensures every actor, director, producer, screenwriter, and other professional involved in the production of silver screen entertainment has a chance to receive recognition and express gratitude for the opportunity to strut their stuff.

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Almost Men

Widows
Historically, women had few legal rights. Cultures the world over considered women merely extensions of the men to whom they were bound and subject to the protection or exploitation of those men without much in the way of legal recourse. In short, women had no separate legal existence from their male guardians whether those guardians be their fathers, husbands, adult brothers, or adult sons. Unless they were widowed.

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Donut Day

Bear Claws, Crullers, and Holes
National Donut Day, established in 1938, occurs the first Friday of June and honors the Salvation Army’s “Doughnut Girls” and the Red Cross’ “Doughnut Dollies” who served donuts to soldiers in the trenches during World Wars I and II, respectively. Although primarily a U.S. holiday, donut shops around the world have been known to hoist a cinnamon roll in celebration.

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Beyond Speech

Talking Animals in Children’s Literature
Anthropomorphism, a fancy term concerning the personification of animals by attributing human characteristics to them, occupies a treasured spot in children’s fiction. The addition of speech to creatures that do not normally engage in conversation such as we humans think of it serves as a mode through which authors teach moral lessons, if only because the animals can talk back. 

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Heroic Heroines

First, let’s consider the heroic tradition which arises from, well, tradition. Let’s be honest, tradition values strength and valor as masculine traits. Look at practically any fairy tale: Cinderella, Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty. They each display traits of traditional feminine ideals: diligence, kindness, generosity, physical beauty, fidelity, and not a courageous or aggressive bone among them.  

First, let’s consider the heroic tradition which arises from, well, tradition. Let’s be honest, tradition values strength and valor as masculine traits. Look at practically any fairy tale: Cinderella, Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty. They each display traits of traditional feminine ideals: diligence, kindness, generosity, physical beauty, fidelity, and not a courageous or aggressive bone among them.  

Female protagonists have waited a long time to break out from those socially imposed confines, but some authors realized the amazing potential of females in the heroic tradition and to pave the way for many of today’s kickass, weapons-toting heroines.
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Sweets for the Sweet

[A]nd as for the sweets, I won’t tell you how cheap and good they were, because it would only make your mouth water in vain.

From The Magician’s Nephew by C. S. Lewis
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May Faith Traditions

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Few months are so active in faith traditions as May, the spring season’s revitalization of nature similarly inspires a resurgence in religious fervor. The world’s three major faith traditions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—each celebrate significant religious holidays during May.

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Keeping the Peace

Law Enforcement
The duty of every government concerns the enforcement of  law, protection of property rights, and preservation of class systems to maintain civil order; however, the concept of a uniformed and professional police force dates back only to the 19th century. Historically, families, clans, and the military assumed and carried out the responsibility for law enforcement, which led to exploitation and abuses, often with vengeance in mind rather than justice.

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Golf

A Tradition of Excellence
Golf is a tradition of excellence. The 15th century Scottish game is one of the world’s most beloved pastimes. The quaint rolling greens and the majestic scenery that comprise most golf courses arise from  meticulous designs by renowned architects, landscapers, and former players to challenge recreational golfers and world champions alike. Whistling Straits in Mosel, Wisconsin, the Old Course at St Andrews in St. Andrews, Scotland, and the Royal Melbourne Golf Course in Australia point to the dedication and ingenuity imperative in crafting the world’s most celebrated courses.

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