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Children's Literature Collection (2,461 Books)


Compiled from scans of original children's books. The World Public Library Children's eBook Collection is a selected list of the most popular children's books, "My First Book Collection." Many of these titles are considered all time classics. We hope you and your family enjoy the collection.

 
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Aesop and Hyssop

By: William Ellery Leonard

Excerpt: DEDICATION TO LUDWIG LEWISOHN. To you, judicious and discerning In wit, in poetry, and learning, I dedicate these random pages. Here is the wisdom of the ages; No insight of the Galilean, No visions to the empyrean; But clever perspicacity Of honest old sagacity, That Man has often found amusing And in his conduct failed of using. For, though the tales were made for reasons, As fitting special times and seasons, Yet, even as men are more than nations, They still...

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Aesop's Fables

By: George Fyler Townsend

Excerpt: THE LIFE and History of Aesop is involved, like that of Homer, the most famous of Greek poets, in much obscurity. Sardis, the capital of Lydia; Samos, a Greek island; Mesembria, an ancient colony in Thrace; and Cotiaeum, the chief city of a province of Phrygia, contend for the distinction of being the birthplace of Aesop. Although the honor thus claimed cannot be definitely assigned to any one of these places, yet there are a few incidents now generally accepted...

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Aesop in Rhyme

By: Jefferys Taylor

Excerpt: THE wind was high, the thunder loud; The lightning flashed from cloud to cloud; When an old oak, whose aged form Ere now had witnessed many a storm, Had borne the brunt, and still withstood The wind, the lightning, and the flood, Was torn up from his roots at last, By one tremendous, wintry blast; Then headlong to the stream descended; His ancient pride and glory ended.

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Aesop's Fables

By: George Fyler Townsend

Excerpt: The tale, the Parable, and the Fable are all common and popular modes of conveying instruction. Each is distinguished by its own special characteristics. The Tale consists simply in the narration of a story either founded on facts, or created solely by the imagination, and not necessarily associated with the teaching of any moral lesson. The Parable is the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained...

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Aesop's Fables : A New Revised Version

By: Harrison Weir

Excerpt: LIFE OF AESOP. The Life and History of Aesop is involved, like that of Homer, the most famous of Greek poets, in much obscurity. Sardis, the capital of Lydia; Samos, a Greek island; Mesembria, an ancient colony in Thrace; and Cotiaeum, the chief city of a province of Phrygia, contend for the distinction of being the birthplace of Aesop. Although the honor thus claimed cannot be definitely assigned to any one of these places, yet there are a few incidents now gen...

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Aesop's Fables

By: Ernest Griset

Excerpt: Twas the Golden Age, when every brute Had voice articulate, in speech was skilled, And the mid-forests with its synods filled. The tongues of rock and pine-leaf then were free; To ship and sailor then would speak the sea; Sparrows with farmers would shrewd talk maintain; Earth gave all fruits, nor asked for toil again. Mortals and gods were wont to mix as friends. To which conclusion all the teaching tends Of sage old ysop.

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Aesop's Fables

By: V.S. Vernon Jones

Excerpt: AESOP embodies an epigram not uncommon in human history; his fame is all the more deserved because he never deserved it. The firm foundations of common sense, the shrewd shots at uncommon sense, that characterize all the Fables, belong not him but to humanity. In the earliest human history whatever is authentic is universal: and whatever is universal is anonymous. In such cases there is always some central man who had first the trouble of collecting them, and af...

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Aesop's Fables

Excerpt: IX presenting to the little readers tins boot of Fables, no wish is entertained to create in them a belief that there ever was a time when beasts and birds could talk. A fable is a feigned narration, designed to convey instruction. The practice of teaching in this way is of very ancient origin, and is continued to this day. Reproof thus administered has often produced the desired effect when open rebuke would have served only to offend or irritate.

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Aesop's Fables

By: Grace Rhys

Excerpt: Enid, this is Esop's house, And the cover is the door; When the rains of winter pour, Then the Lion and the Mouse, And the Frogs that asked a king, And all the Beasts with curious features, That talk just like us human creatures, Open it, and ask you in !

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Aesop's Fables

By: Rev. Thomas James M.A.

Excerpt: THE LIFE AND FABLES OF. IN the days of Croesus, King of Lydia, when Amasis was Pharaoh of Egypt, and Peisistratus lorded it over the Athenians, between five and six hundred years before the Christian era, lived SOPUS, no inapt representative of the great social and intellectual movement of the age which he adorned.

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Aesop's Fables

By: V.S. Vernon Jones

Excerpt: AESOP embodies an epigram not uncommon in human history; his fame is all the more deserved because he never deserved it. The firm foundations of common sense, the shrewd shots at uncommon sense, that characterize all the Fables, belong not him but to humanity. In the earliest human history whatever is authentic is universal: and whatever is universal is anonymous. In such cases there is always some central man who had first the trouble of collecting them, and af...

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Aesop's Fables with His Life, Morals, And Remarks

Excerpt:

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Aesop's Fables : A New Translation

By: V.S. Vernon Jones

Excerpt: AESOP, the most famous fabulist of all time, is a figure shrouded in mystery. Because it is unlikely that early remarks in authors like Herodotus, Aristophanes and Plato have no foundation in reality, it can cautiously be said that Aesop was a slave in the sixth century B.C., that he came from Phrygia and lived in Samos, and that he was known for his ability to craft fables (logoi). The story that Aesop met his end at Delphi, where he was sentenced to death and ...

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Aladdin : Or, The Wonderful Lamp

By: Grace Rhys

Excerpt: If I had the Lamp of Aladdin of old, I would bind my book in silver and gold, and tie its leaves with a silken string! But now I think don?t, I do not need it; for, Leila and Nora, as you open and read it,...

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Alice and Beatrice

By: Grandmamma

Excerpt: VISIT TO GRANDMAMMA WALKS TO THE SEASHORE BATHING IN THE SEA. Alice and Beatrice were two little girls of about four and six years of age. They were staying with their grandmamma. Alice and Beatrice were very glad to be with their grandmamma, for she lived in the country and near the sea. They liked to see -the green fields, full of pretty flowers, and to play in the nice large garden, and to walk up and down the high hills that were on all sides the house, and ...

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Alice : And Other Fairy Plays for Children

By: Kate Freiligrath-Kroeker

Excerpt: LIKE most plays of this kind, these fairy dramas were originally written to supply a ?home demand. They are now presented to the public in a collective form, a dramatic version of Mr. Lewis Carroll's ?Alice being added to the original plays.

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

By: Lewis Carrol

Excerpt: All in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide: For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands Make vain Pretence Our wanderings to guide.

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The Plays of J. M. Barrie Alice Sit-By-The-Fire

By: J.M. Barrie

Excerpt: ALICE SIT-BY-THE-FIRE. I One would like to peep covertly into Amy's diary (octavo, with the word 'Amy' in gold letters wandering across the soft brown leather covers, as if it was a long word and, in Amy's opinion, rather a dear). To take such a liberty, and allow the reader to look over our shoulders, as they often invite you to do in novels (which, however, are much more coquettish things than plays) would be very helpful to us; we should learn at once what so...

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and through the Looking-Glass

By: Lewis Carroll

Excerpt: ALL in the golden afternoon Full leisurely we glide; For both our oars, with little skill, By little arms are plied, While little hands make vain pretence...

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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland : Retold in Words of One Syllable

By: J.C. Gorham

Excerpt: DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE. Alice had sat on the bank by her sister till she was tired. Once or twice she had looked at the book her sister held in her hand, but there were no pictures in it, and what is the use of a book, thought Alice, with-out pictures? She asked her-self as well as she could, for the hot day made her feel quite dull, if it would be worth while to get up and pick some daisies to make a chain. Just then a white rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her.

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