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Title Searching for the Non-Professional

By: Jackie Mahi Erickson

Many people are curious about the history of ownership of their property, or wonder if they have a claim to property occupied by another. Others are curious as to whether their family ever owned land in Hawaii. These people may be reluctant to undertake the expense of hiring someone to do a title search for them and would be willing to do the work themselves, if they had some guidance on how to proceed. This guide is designed to assist the layperson in tracing property ...

Most people who are interested in conducting a title search have a specific parcel of property in mind when they start. This type of search follows a specific pattern and the searcher must take care that no steps are omitted or there will be much duplication of effort. The procedure requires identifying the present owner and then tracing ownership backwards in time to the Great Mahele. The first step to be taken involves the proper identification of the property in question.

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Na Mele O Hawaii Nei: 101 Hawaiian Songs

By: Samuel H. Elbert

These 101 songs are all postmissionary and owe their musical origin to missionary hymns. None of them are technically chants but some, such as " 'Alika," "Hole Wai-mea," and "Maika'i Kaua'i," are chants that have been edited and set to music. The songs date from the mid-1850's to 1968—the date of Mary Kawena Pukui's Christmas song translations. The majority are from the time of the monarchy and so are already somewhat venerable. Nearly all are sung often today and are we...

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He Kuhikuhi O Ke Kanaka Hawaii (A Guide for Hawaiians)

By: J. W. H. Kauwahi

O ka agreement, oia ka Olelo Ae like, i hanaia a i hoo-holoia mawaena o na kanaka elua, a he lehulehu paha, no na mea a pau a laua, a o lakou paha i ae pu ai e hana. I ka manawa e palapala ai i olelo ae like mawaena o na aoao elua, he mea pono e hooopaa ia maloko o ka palapala na kumu nui, a me na mea a pau i ae like ia, a e kakau inoa ia hoi e na aoao elua nana ia olelo, a me na hoike pu no hoi; a nolaila i kapaia?i kela, he olelo ae like. O na kuinu manao, a ine na me...

He olelo ae like keia no ka hana ana a me ke kukulu ana i ka hale, i hanaia i keia la umi o Ianuari, M. H. hookahi tausani ewalu haneri a me kanalima kumamaono, mawaena o Lola Haleakala no Kapalama, Oahu, ma ka aoao mua, a me Laakea no Honolulu, Oahu, ma ka aoao elua, a eia na olelo a laua i ae like ai; o ka mea nona ka aoao elua i hoikeia maluna, ke hoopaa nei oia, a ke ae aku nei me ka mea nona ka aoao mua i oleloia maluna, e hana no oia, a e kapili pono, a e hana a pa...

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A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language

By: Lorrin Andrews

It was the intention of the author of this volume to make some extended remarks concerning the character, peculiarities and extent of the hawaiian language, by way of preface or introduction; but the want of physical strength, and especially of mental energy, has induced him to forego such an attempt and be contented with a mere history of the manner in which this dictionary has come into existence. The history of hawaiian lexicography is short.

Hawaiian is but a dialect of the great Polynesian language, which is spoken with extraordinary uniformity over all the numerous islands of the Pacific Ocean between New Zealand and Hawaii. Again, the Polynesian language is but one member of that wide-spread family of languages, known as the Malayo-Polynesian or Oceanic family, which extends from Madagascar to the Hawaiian Islands, and from New Zealand to Formosa. The Hawaiian dialect is peculiarly interesting to the...

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A’Ohe Inoa Komo ‘Ole O Ke ‘Ai

By: William H. Wilson

The internationally known ‘Aha Punana Leo, Inc. is a non-profit organization which was established in 1983 to revitalize the nearly extinct Hawaiian language and establish schools taught entirely through that language. The following year, the organization founded the first Punana Leo school which was also the first Native American language immersion school in the United States. After the Punana Leo families changed an 1896 law banning Hawaiian language schools, the Punan...

Kula Kaiapuni Hawai’i is usually a stream of classes within an English medium school. While children in the English medium classes often admire the ability to speak Hawaiian, they also sometimes tease Kula Kaiapuni Hawai’i students for being different. Although all children tease each other, being teased while in a minority position requires some positive support. This book was written in response to parents' requests for help in dealing with a true-life situation: the d...

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