World Library  

Other People Who Read Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus Also Read


 
  • Cover Image

The Parson's Daughter of Oxney Colne

By: Anthony Trollope

Excerpt: THE prettiest scenery in all England?and if I am contradicted in that assertion, I will say in all Europe?is in Devonshire, on the southern and south?eastern skirts of Dartmoor, where the rivers Dart, and Avon, and Teign form themselves, and where the broken moor is half cultivated, and the wild?looking upland fields are half moor. In making this assertion I am often met with much doubt, but it is by persons who do not really know the locality. Men and women tal...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Lines Written Among the Euganean Hills

By: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Many a green isle needs must be In the deep wide sea of Misery, Or the mariner, worn and wan, Never thus could voyage on — Day and night, and night and day, Drifting on his dreary way, With the solid darkness black Closing round his vessel's track; Whilst above the sunless sky, Big with clouds, hangs heavily, And behind the tempest fleet Hurries on with lightning feet, Riving sail, and cord, and plank, Till the ship has almost drank Death from the o'er-brimming deep; And...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Middle Years

By: Henry James

Excerpt: THE April day was soft and bright, and poor Dencombe, happy in the conceit of reasserted strength, stood in the garden of the hotel, comparing, with a deliberation in which however there was still something of languor, the attractions of easy strolls.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Seven, Seven, Seven : City : A Tale of the Telephone

By: Julius Chambers

I WENT to my telephone exactly at eleven o'clock on the night of December 30th last winter to call up the editor of my paper. My house was on the west side of Regent's Park, and the wire ran to the City telephone exchange. Apparently my line was switched into connection with the Fleet Street exchange. But delay followed. I was familiar with the peculiar hum caused by the induction on the wires, but that night the sounds were of an unusual character. The operator at the C...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Robinson Crusoe

By: Daniel Defoe

Excerpt: I WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull. He got a good estate by merchandise, and leaving off his trade, lived afterwards at York, from whence he had married my mother, whose relations were named Robinson, a very good family in that country, and from whom I was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but, by the usual corruption of words in England, we ar...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Theory of the Leisure Class

By: Thorstein B. Veblen

Excerpt: Chapter One. Introductory The institution of a leisure class is found in its best development at the higher stages of the barbarian culture; as, for instance, in feudal Europe or feudal Japan. In such communities the distinction between classes is very rigorously observed; and the feature of most striking economic significance in these class differences is the distinction maintained between the employments proper to the several classes. The upper classes are by ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Witch

By: Mary Elizabeth Coleridge

Excerpt: I have walked a great while over the snow, And I am not tall nor strong. My clothes are wet, and my teeth are set, And the way was hard and long. I have wandered over the fruitful earth, But I never came here before. Oh, lift me over the threshold, and let me in at the door! The cutting wind is a cruel foe; I dare not stand in the blast. My hands are stone, and my voice a groan, And the worst of death is past. I am but a little maiden still; My little white feet...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Critical and Historical Essays : Vol. 2

By: Thomas Babington Macaulay

Those who have attended to the practice of our literary tribunal are well aware that, by means of certain legal fictions similar to those of Westminster Hall, we are frequently enabled to take cognisance of cases lying beyond the sphere of our original jurisdiction. We need hardly say, therefore, that in the present instance M. Perier is merely a Richard Roe, who will not be mentioned in any subsequent stage of the proceedings, and whose name is used for the sole purpose...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Beacon Lights of History, Volume X

By: John Lord

Excerpt: WILLIAM IV. 1765?1837. ENGLISH REFORMS. On the death of George IV. in 1830, a new political era dawned on England. His brother, William IV., who succeeded him, was not his equal in natural ability, but was more respectable in his character and more liberal in his views. With William IV. began the undisputed ascendency of the House of Commons in national affairs. Before his day, no prime minister could govern against the will of the sovereign. After George IV., a...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Fragmenta Regalia

By: Paul Hentzner

Excerpt: A MAJOR PALATII. The principal note of her reign will be, that she ruled much by faction and parties, which she herself both made, upheld, and weakened, as her own great judgment advised; for I do dissent from the common and received opinion, that my Lord of Leicester was ABSOLUTE and ALONE in her GRACE; and, though I come somewhat short of the knowledge of these times, yet, that I may not err or shoot at random, I know it from assured intelligence that it was n...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Christian Slave

By: Harriet Beecher Stowe

Excerpt: SCENE I. UNCLE TOM?S CABIN. A Table with cups, saucers, AUNT CHLOE cooking at the fire; UNCLE TOM and GEO. SHELBY at a table, with slate between them; MOSE and PETE playing with baby in the corner. Geo. Shelby. Ha! ha! ha! Uncle Tom! Why, how funny! brought up the tail of your g wrong side out makes a q, don?t you see? Uncle Tom. La sakes! now, does it? Geo. S. Why yes. Look here now [writing rapidly], that?s g , and that?s q that?s g that?s q. See now? Aunt Chl...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Deputy of Arcis

By: Honoré de Balzac

Before beginning to describe an election in the provinces, it is proper to state that the town of Arcis-sur-Aube was not the theatre of the events here related. The arrondissement of Arcis votes at Bar-sur-Aube, which is forty miles from Arcis; consequently there is no deputy from Arcis in the Chamber. Discretion, required in a history of contemporaneous manners and morals, dictates this precautionary word. It is rather an ingenious contrivance to make the description of...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Essays of Montaigne. Done into English by John Florio, Anno 16...

By: Michel de Montaigne

I never yet saw that father, but let his son be never so decrepit or deformed, would not, notwithstanding, own him: not, nevertheless, if he were not totally besotted, and blinded with his paternal affection, that he did not well enough discern his defects; but that with all defaults he was still his. Just so, I see better than any other, that all I write here are but the idle reveries of a man that has only nibbled upon the outward crust of sciences in his nonage, and o...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Literary Lapses

By: Stephen Leacock

Excerpt: My Financial Career When I go into a bank I get rattled. The clerks rattle me; the wickets rattle me; the sight of the money rattles me; everything rattles me. The moment I cross the threshold of a bank and attempt to transact business there, I become an irresponsible idiot. I knew this beforehand, but my salary had been raised to fifty dollars a month and I felt that the bank was the only place for it. So I shambled in and looked timidly round at the clerks. I ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Mystery of the Boule Cabinet; A Detective Story

By: Burton Egbert Stevenson

Excerpt: Chapter 1. A CONNOISSEUR?S VAGARY ?Hello!? I said, as I took down the receiver of my desk ?phone, in answer to the call. ?Mr. Vantine wishes to speak to you, sir,? said the office?boy. ?All right,? and I heard the snap of the connection. ?Is that you, Lester?? asked Philip Vantine?s voice. ?Yes. So you?re back again?? ?Got in yesterday. Can you come up to the house and lunch with me to?day?? ?I?ll be glad to,? I said, and meant it, for I liked Philip Vantine. ?I...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Beulah

By: Augusta J. Evans

CHAPTER I: A January sun had passed the zenith, and the slanting rays flamed over the window panes of a large brick building, bearing on its front in golden letters the inscription Orphan Asylum. The structure was commodious, and surrounded by wide galleries, while the situation offered a silent tribute to the discretion and good sense of the board of managers who selected the suburbs instead of the more densely populated portion of the city. The whitewashed palings incl...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Master-Christian

By: Marie Corelli

But, said the Cardinal half aloud, with the gentle dawning of a tender smile brightening the fine firm curve of his lips,—it is not the end! The end here, no doubt;—but the beginning—THERE! He raised his eyes devoutly, and instinctively touched the silver crucifix hanging by its purple ribbon at his breast. The orange-red glow of the sun encompassed him with fiery rings, as though it would fain consume his thin, black-garmented form after the fashion in which flames cons...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Orestes or Visions of Crime

By: Frank J. Morlock

Excerpt: CHARACTER: ORESTES: played by the author The action takes place in Tauris, at the entrance to a sacred grove, near the palace of Thoas.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Pain Masters Bride

By: Rexton Archer

Excerpt: Edmund Neymores felt chill honor at sight of Fulton Xavier?s sensational statue of a man in pain. But Neymores did not know real horror until he saw the ghastly torment of a helpless girl as she posed for a newer masterpiece.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Veiled Prophet

By: Maxwell Grant

RALPH JORCOTT settled himself in a corner of the half-filled subway car and casually began to read an evening newspaper. The headlines pleased him; they referred to crime. Not merely one crime, but a dozen; all belonging to a mysterious wave that had swept New York. Crimes that were particularly baffling, because the police were totally unable to trace the real perpetrators. Jewel thefts, robberies of art treasures, stock swindles, and other specialties had been executed...

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 21 - 40 of 45 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Fair are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.